The People of Sparks, by Jeanne DuPrau

210px-The-People-of-SparksSpoilers for the first book in the series.

The People of Sparks takes up where The City of Ember left off. Lina and Doon have flung down the instructions for escaping Ember, and Lina’s guardian picks them up. Within a few days, many of the people from Ember have arrived aboveground. The people from Ember find a post-Disaster settlement, Sparks, and the book deals with what happens when two cultures come into conflict, what happens when limited resources causes stress on people, how war comes to pass. What happens in Sparks becomes a small-scale metaphor for what happened to the world pre-Disaster.

I didn’t like this book as much as I did the first in the series. Unlike Ember, which was much more universal, this book could definitely be categorized as juvenile fiction. DuPrau treats the reader like they are a little simpler than her audience for the first book. There was a certain amount of toddleresque fairy-tale quality to it, complete with built-in moral (war is bad and too easy to get into). It was more predictable, it had a definite moral statement to make, and overall, it wasn’t as well-written or engaging. Having said that, I did like the book, and I do plan on reading the others in the series. I just hope they aren’t as predictable as this one.

Not much else to say without spoilers, but I must say I’ve learned not to trust Lizzie (one of Lina’s friends). She’s never a bad guy, but she’s certainly no good judge of character…

About Amanda

Writing. Family. Books. Crochet. Fitness. Fashion. Fun. Not necessarily in that order. Note: agender (she/her).
This entry was posted in 2008, Children's, Prose and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to The People of Sparks, by Jeanne DuPrau

  1. Pingback: The Prophet of Yonwood, by Jeanne DuPrau | The Zen Leaf

  2. Pingback: The Diamond of Darkhold, by Jeanne DuPrau | The Zen Leaf

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