Sunday Coffee – More Abandoned

So…I’ve now abandoned two books this month. I cull many, many books after the first few pages or even the first few chapters, but I don’t consider a book abandoned unless I make a great effort to get into it and read a considerable chunk of it (generally past the 50% line). This week’s abandoned book was Depression Hates a Moving Target by Nita Sweeney.

I began this book at the beginning of March. It’s a memoir detailing the ways in which Sweeney struggled with bipolar disorder and her journey into running. She is a slow, unconventional runner (at least for the percentage of the book that I read), which made her journey more relatable for me. And yet, I still couldn’t get into the book. After six weeks stalled out around the 50% mark, I finally gave up.

I’ve never been a big memoir person. Every once in awhile, I find one I enjoy, but I’m not generally a fan of the format. I prefer memoirs and personal stories in visual format. (This might explain why I enjoy Lucy Knisley’s graphic memoirs, when usually I’m not a fan of graphic novels/nonfiction most of the time.) Sweeney’s story was interesting, but by the time I got to the middle of the book, I felt like I’d read everything I’d needed to read. I have no idea what else happens afterwards because it seems like all had been said? I don’t know. Memoirs often feel like that to me. Probably why they aren’t my favorite.

Anyway, it’s a good book, well-written, and an interesting look at running in a way that doesn’t involve super-athletic superhuman feats of crazy races and some such. I recommend it, even if I didn’t personally finish it.

PS – Happy Easter to those who celebrate. I hope you’re staying safe at home. Our family will miss going out to egg hunt at my grandparents’ ranch, or even hosting Easter at our home like we did last year, but safety first. The boys will be doing an indoor egg hunt and a cascarone fight out in the front yard.

About Amanda

Writing. Family. Books. Crochet. Fitness. Fashion. Fun. Not necessarily in that order. Note: agender (she/her).
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